Hate Meetings? Try Facilitating.

Hate Meetings? Try Facilitating. By Jaimie Blackman.  MMR November 2019 Hypothetical. Repair believes that Sales is making promises to customers that are impossible to keep, like the time it takes to repair an instrument. Sales believes that repair is deliberately slowing down work, preventing them from being competitive. Your team is at war and the loser is the organization who is experiencing a drop in both sales and repairs. The biggest stakeholders of the organization are in the middle. The knee jerk reaction is to schedule a meeting and have the owner or general manager read the riot act. Instead of telling repair and sales what to do, try helping them agree on a way to improve the process. Be the facilitator. To read the rest, Click Here to check out my November MMR column    

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Protect Your Business by Insuring Your Intangibles

71% of organizations claimed they were very dependent on one or two key employees, yet only 22% had key-person life insurance.* Key Person Insurance. Businesses regularly insure their tangible, physical assets like buildings, inventory, and equipment, but often overlook their most important asset - their people. Each business, regardless of its size, has an individual or group of individuals who contribute to its success. The unexpected death, disability or illness sustained by one of these "key" people can threaten the success of the company. A key person insurance strategy helps the business insure against financial impact if a key employee is no longer able to contribute. Here's how it Works. The business owns, pays for, and is the beneficiary of a life insurance policy on the life of the key manager. The business can use the income tax-free death benefit to replace lost profits, recruit and/ or retain qualified replacements, or…

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What’s Your Business Worth?

What’s your business worth? October 2019, MMR. Mirror, mirror on the wall, who’s the fairest of them all? We think we are better looking than we are. We think we drive better than we do. And we think our business is worth more than it is. Psychologists describe this inflated view as “illusory superiority.” In my January 2018 MMR column, I did my own reality check on the subject of valuation during an interview with Steve Zapf, the past President of Music & Arts. (Jeff Gottlieb succeeded Steve Zapf as President this past April). With more than 500 retail and affiliate locations, the organization is the go-to-company to ask about valuation. To read the rest, Click Here to check out my October MMR column

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The Art of Music Retail

The Art of Music Retail September 2019, MMR. “Good business is the best art” Andy Warhol Andy Warhol, a leading figure in pop art, was fascinated with, and excelled at, business.  He believed that business was the highest form of art. All art, embodies the intangible nature of life. Readers of this column understand very well what the intangible qualities of music are: rhythm, melody, harmony, tone color, dynamics & structure. It is these intangible qualities which captures the quality of human feelings, the key drivers of the music experience. To read the rest, Click Here to check out my September MMR column

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Confessions of a Succession Planner

After almost two decades as a financial advisor, there is one lesson I have learned, which I can reveal with completely certainty. People are planning averse. When it comes to individual planning such as financial or estate planning, people have a hard time focusing on goals that are beyond six months. The process can be complex and the decisions required can be numerous. The obstacles are even greater for a business owner. Just mention the term succession planning, and you can see the pain on the owner’s face. To read the rest, Click Here to check out my August MMR column

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Identity Theft! Part 2

“There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root.” Henry David Thoreau Last month, my MMR column focused on education and awareness of identity theft, a crime which has impacted every part of our life. Types of information which have been compromised include: Social Security Number, Credit/Debit card number, Protected Health Information, DMV Records, Financial Accounts, and Email/Password. Source- ITRC 2018. In part 2, I will be sharing best practices for identity theft Prevention, Monitoring and Recovery. Just in time for your summer travel season, a gold mine for thieves. Let’s start with a personal story. To read the rest, Click Here to check out my July MMR column

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Identity Theft! Part 1.

According to the U.S. Department of Justice, in 2016, a whopping 26 million Americans 16 or older, reported they had been victims of identity theft during the prior 12 months. The good news is 88% had almost no out-of-pocket losses. Still, behind every number is a real person, with a real story, and that’s where we begin. Consider the following true story.  A woman receives a bill from a hospital, requesting payment for a surgical procedure which included an amputation of her left foot. The problem…. She never had the surgery, as demonstrated by the fact that both her feet were intact. To read the rest, Click Here to check out my June MMR column

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Sounds Flat? Try Tuning up Your Brain

Listening is the musician’s currency. When something interferes with listening, it can be torture, especially for the performing artist. 50 million people in America today have reported ringing in the ear – a definite problem for music listeners and music makers. This ringing is called tinnitus, a medical term for auditory perceptions usually heard in the ear(s), but not produced by external sound. Since tinnitus can be brought on by exposure to loud sounds, it’s no surprise that a disproportionate number of musicians have it. To read the rest, Click Here to check out my May MMR column

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Identity Theft

What is Identity Theft? Identity theft is the misuse of another person's identifying information. In true identity theft, an identity thief uses another person's Social Security number and other identifying information to fraudulently open new accounts for financial gain. Victims may be unaware of the fraud for an extended period of time, which can allow the criminal to continue the ruse for months or even years. The criminal can use the victim's identity to work, receive medical care and commit other types of fraud. Account-takeover and credit-related fraud are common problems associated with identity theft. The Case of the Disappearing $300,000 Loan. Content published by CyberScout.com For homebuyers, nothing beats the excitement and relief that comes with a home loan approval. So you can imagine the horror when those funds suddenly disappear.  John and Nancy Ritter* experienced the trauma of this situation firsthand when a thief used stolen personal information to initiate a fraudulent wire transfer of…

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