Avoiding the Common 1040 Mistakes. Don’t let these slip-ups creep into your federal tax return.

facebooktwitterlinkedinby featheruncle_sam_pointing_fingerNo one wants to delay their federal tax refund. As you certainly don’t, filling out your 1040 form correctly is essential. To that end, it is worth noting some of the common 1040 mistakes – the little slip-ups that aggravate both the IRS and the taxpayer.

Not signing your return. If you file online (and who doesn’t), you have to type your name on the “Your Signature” line in the “Sign Here” section, along with your spouse’s name if you file jointly. If you still file a hard-copy return, you’ve got to sign your name on the “Your Signature” line, and the same goes for your spouse on the “Spouse’s signature” line. No valid signature equals an invalid return.1

Not getting your name right. Believe or not, some people mistype their names as they e-file. More commonly, they enter an old name – a maiden name, for example – that doesn’t match the name linked to this taxpayer identification number. If you’ve changed your name, the Social Security Administration (and other federal agencies, as applicable) need to know that.1

Missing the filing deadline(s) applicable to you or your business. Is your company an S corp? That means you will probably need to file a Form 1120S by March 15. Is it a sole proprietorship? That means you have until April 15 to file a Form 1040C. If you are new to making estimated tax payments, you have hopefully pored over Form 1040-ES with a tax professional to figure out how much tax is due by each quarterly payment period.2

Turning in Form 4868 (the “extension”) gives you until October 15 to file, although any federal taxes owed must still be paid by April 15. If you are a servicemember on duty outside the U.S. and Puerto Rico, you have until June 15 to file your return and pay taxes, and you can also use Form 4868 to file as late as October 15.3

If you file late (that is, you submit your return after April 15 without using Form 4868 to request an extension), you face a penalty – a 5% penalty per month following the return’s due date, capping out at a 25% maximum penalty after five months. The penalty for unpaid taxes is .5% per month after the April 15 deadline, and 6% interest a year. If you have taxes a year overdue, you will be assessed both the monthly and yearly penalties.2

 Making numerical errors. Even with some of the great tax prep software now available, math errors still happen. In fact, they happen largely because people don’t use the software: the taxpayers who insist on filing paper returns are 20 times more likely to commit math mistakes than those who e-file, the IRS reports.1

If an electronically filed return contains a math mistake, it gets sent back to the taxpayer or tax professional for correction and resubmission. If a paper return has a math mistake, the IRS has to refigure it on the taxpayer’s behalf. That takes time.1   

Additionally, some taxpayers get Social Security numbers wrong – not necessarily their own, but those of their spouses. Also, a smooth direct deposit of a federal tax refund won’t happen if a taxpayer types in an inaccurate bank account number.1

Selecting the wrong filing status. This happens a lot with divorced moms and dads. To determine if they should check the “head of household” box or the “single” box, they should take the online interview at irs.gov/uac/What-is-My-Filing-Status%3F.4

Claiming a credit or deduction you shouldn’t. Again, tax prep software tends to ward off this mistake. Credits often inappropriately claimed (or ignored): the Child and Dependent Care Credit, the Earned Income Tax Credit and even the standard deduction.1

Many business owners overlook deductions or claim them in error. Sometimes this can be traced back to slipshod recordkeeping; other times, it stems from faulty assumptions. According to a survey from small business accounting software maker Xero, the most common merited deductions that aren’t claimed by SBOs are those for depreciation (30%), out-of-pocket capital expenses (29%) and car and truck expenses (16%).2

Claiming employees as independent contractors. Some small business owners try to save money by doing this, but the IRS may disagree with such claims. If so, the business can end up on the hook for employment taxes related to that employee.2

So what steps can you take to try and reduce the risk of errors on your 1040 form? You can file electronically, you can use some of the terrific tax prep software available, and you can turn to a skilled tax professional to help you prepare and file your return. No one is perfect, but those are all good moves to make this tax season.

 

 

    

Citations.

1 – money.cnn.com/gallery/pf/taxes/2014/04/08/tax-mistakes/index.html [4/8/15]

2 – nerdwallet.com/blog/small-business/5-frequent-small-business-tax-mistakes-avoid/ [10/15/14]

3 – irs.gov/taxtopics/tc304.html [1/16/15]

4 – irs.gov/uac/What-is-My-Filing-Status%3F [1/12/15]

 

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This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Written by Jaimie Blackman

Jaimie Blackman

Jaimie Blackman — a former music educator & retailer— is a Certified Wealth Strategist & Succession Planner. Jaimie helps business owners maximize the value of their company through education & coaching. He is a frequent speaker at the National Association of Music Merchants, (NAMM) Idea Center and has spoken at Yamaha’s succession advantage.

As a financial literacy educator he has taught at New York University and has lectured at the 92nd Street Y, Marymount Manhattan College and CUNY.

His column is published in The Music & Sound Retailer and contributes to NAMM U online, as well as other industry trade magazines.

Jaimie is CEO of Jaimie Blackman & Company, President of BH Wealth Management, and Creator of MoneyCapsules® and the Sound of Money®.

To register for Jaimie’s live webinars, or to subscribe to his podcasts, visit jaimieblackman.com.

The purpose of this post is to educate. Our content should not be construed as advice. If legal, tax or other advice is required by the readers, professional advice should be sought.

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